Illinois Real Estate Land

  

WEST CENTRAL ILLINOIS STATE PARKS
 

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SILOAM SPRINGS STATE PARK

Nature's bounty has conspired to produce a natural beauty and source of recreation greatly prized by generations of Midwesterners at Siloam Springs State Park, just minutes east of Quincy.

The beautifully wooded terrain, sparkling lake, and carefully maintained facilities make this 3,323 acre site one of the most beautiful parks in Illinois. It's an ideal setting for outdoor visits, whether your interest is hunting, fishing, camping, boating, picnicking, hiking or bird watching. The park is surrounded by luxuriantly forested gullies and scenic crests alive with wild roses, black-eyed Susans, white false indigo and snapdragons.

History
Originally part of the "military tract" of western Illinois (land set aside to be given to combat veterans), the area was acquired in 1852 by George Meyers for his service in the Black Hawk and Mexican wars. He died in 1882 at the age of 102. Legend has it that spring water in the area had a medicinal effect, thus the name Siloam Springs from a Biblical reference, so-called by the Rev. Reuben K. McCoy, who had discovered the springs following the Civil War.

After Meyers' death, Quincy Burgesser, a local businessman and stock dealer, became aware of the springs and their "curative value." He had the water analyzed and discovered it had more "strength" (a higher mineral content) than water from the famous Eureka and Waukesha springs.

Burgesser touted the water's ability to cure almost all ailments, even drunkenness and drug addiction. By 1884 he had erected two spring houses, a bathing house and the Siloam Forest Home Hotel, and the area became a popular and fashionable resort. Water from the No. 2 spring was bottled and distributed as far west as Kansas City and bottling became a flourishing business for several decades.

In 1935, the Siloam Springs Recreation Club purchased the site in an effort to restore it and provide a place of recreation for the local population. Citizens of Adams and Brown counties raised money to match state funds and by 1940 an agreement was reached to make it a state recreation area. Eventually, the old hotel and bath houses were torn down, the swimming pool abandoned and the springs no longer were used. The No. 2 spring house was rebuilt in 1995 and contains the most popular spring.

In 1954 and 1955, an earthen dam was constructed across a deep ravine and the 58-acre lake was created. In 1956 Siloam Springs was dedicated as a state park, and efforts began to develop its recreational facilities.

Picnicking
Old Siloam picnic area provides visitors with four shelters, charcoal grills, rest rooms, shaded tables and playground equipment. The main shelter house, which holds more than 20 tables, also provides flush toilets, hot and cold water, grills, playground equipment, plenty of parking and a set of horseshoe pits. In addition, there are several other smaller areas scattered along the park entrance road providing tables and grills. Illinois hunting ground and hunting farms for sale

Camping
If you want to spend a night or two under the stars, there are 98 Class A camp sites featuring rest rooms, showers and electricity, 84 Class B camp sites featuring showers and rest rooms, and four backpack camp sites, in addition to a special group campground. There is a centrally located shower facility available to all campers. Campsite Reservations are NOT accepted.

Horse Trails and Equestrian Camping
The park contains equestrian trails totaling 23 miles, covering ridgetops and steep wooded valleys. There is a separate camping area for riders and their mounts, with water and limited electricity. Horse rentals are not available.

Concession
Boat and Canoe rentals, a variety of bait and tackle, snack foods, soda and sandwiches are available on a seasonal basis from the concession stand by the lake, phone 217-894-6271.

Fishing
The lake is stocked with largemouth bass, bluegill, redear and green sunfish, carp, crappie, channel catfish and rainbow trout. An Illinois fishing license and an Inland Trout stamp are required and should be purchased before arriving at the park. Designated as a fish preserve by the Department of Natural Resources, only sport fishing tackle is allowed, and anglers may not use more than two poles and four hooks. There are six fishing piers around the lake as well as bank fishing.

Boating
Row boats, canoes and paddle boats may be rented, and there is a launching ramp for private craft. Only electric motors are allowed, no outboards.

Hiking
Hiking the Siloam Springs trails brings you closer to the many wildflowers found throughout the park, including wild roses, snapdragons and black-eyed Susans. There are about 12 miles of scenic hiking trails that go from valleys to flatlands throughout the park, including a combination 6-mile hiking and backpacking trail. Most trails are easy, but Hoot Owl at 1.5 miles and Red Oak backpack trail at 4 miles are moderate. Four primitive camp sites are also available for those who wish to hike to them.

Hunting | Hunter Fact Sheet | Buckhorn Unit Hunter Fact Sheet

Non-Resident Archery Deer Draw Results
When game populations justify, in-season hunting is available. Please contact the park office for species, shooting times, opening dates and areas opened.

Winter Sports
Winter activities include ice skating, ice fishing, cross-country skiing and sledding.

Directions
From Quincy, IL, Take IL Rte 104 9 miles East to County Road 1200 N. Follow signs 12 miles to County Road 2873E, then South 3 miles to park entrance. Park Office is 1.5 miles from entrance. Park signs in place from Rte. 104 to park entrance.

From Springfield, IL, Take I 72 West to Griggsville and go North on Rte 107 for 11 miles. There, turn west on Rte.104 for 15 miles to County Road 2873E. Turn North for 6 miles to park entrance. Office is 1.5 miles from entrance. Park signs in place from Rte. 104 to the park entrance.

From Peoria, IL, Take US Rte. 24 to just outside of Clayton. There, turn South on County Road 2950E then South 10 miles to Kellerville, then West on 1200N 1 mile. Then to County Road 2873 South for 3 miles to park entrance. Park office is 1.5 miles from entrance. Park signs in place from Rte. 24 to park entrance.

While groups of 25 or more are welcome and encouraged to use the park's facilities, they are required to register in advance with the site office to avoid crowding or scheduling conflicts.
At least one responsible adult must accompany each group of 15 minors.
Pets must be kept on leashes at all times.
Actions by nature can result in closed roads and other facilities. Please call ahead to the park office before you make your trip.
We hope you enjoy your stay. Remember, take only memories, leave only footprints.
For more information on tourism in Illinois, call the Illinois Department of Economic Opportunity, Bureau of Tourism at 1-800-2Connect.
Telecommunication Device for Deaf and Hearing Impaired Natural Resources Information (217) 782-9175 for TDD only Relay Number 800-526-0844.

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Siloam Springs - Buckhorn Unit Hunter Fact Sheet
2008 - 2009 Season
INTRODUCTION: Siloam Springs State Park Buckhorn Unit was acquired by the State of Illinois in the Spring of 2001. The site is characterized by high-quality forest game hunting opportunities. Wildlife habitat enhancement practices such as food plots and rotational mowing improve hunting opportunities. Sunflowers are planted each year.

LOCATION: Siloam Springs State Park Buckhorn Unit is located six miles south of Timewell off Route 24 or nine miles north of Route 104 in Brown county.

DESCRIPTION: Total Acres: 2,274; Open Acres: 1,000; Water Acres: 20; Huntable Acres: 2,200; Timbered Acres: 1,254


SETTING: The area is comprised of a mixture of wooded ravines with crop fields present on the ridges and in the creek bottoms. Many of the crop fields have been idled and established to perennial grasses. In others natural succession of woody plants is occurring at various stages. The woodlands consist of a relatively young stand of oak-hickory timber with some interspersed brushy fallowed pasture areas.

SEASONS, HOURS, LIMITS:

SPECIES
SEASON
HOURS
SPECIAL RULES/PERMITS*
SQUIRREL STATEWIDE STATEWIDE SITE PERMIT REQUIRED
DOVE STATEWIDE NOON-5 P.M. THRU SEPT 5. THEN STATEWIDE HUNTING IN DOVE FIELDS AT STAKED SITES ONLY; THROUGH SEPT 5 (2 HUNTERS PER STAKE)
DEER/TURKEY
(ARCHERY)** STATEWIDE ***** STATEWIDE SITE PERMIT REQUIRED
(ILLINOIS RESIDENTS ONLY)
DEER (LATE WINTER) STATEWIDE STATEWIDE SPECIAL PERMIT REQUIED. SPRINGFIELD DRAWING.
TURKEY (FALL SHOTGUN) STATEWIDE STATEWIDE BROWN COUNTY PERMIT - 10 HUNTERS MAXIMUM (ILLINOIS RESIDENTS ONLY)
TURKEY (SPRING) STATEWIDE STATEWIDE SPECIAL PERMIT REQUIRED - SPRINGFIELD DRAWING
RABBIT/QUAIL SEE BELOW*** STATEWIDE SPECIAL PERMIT REQUIRED - SPRINGFIELD DRAWING
RACCOON**** STATEWIDE STATEWIDE SPECIAL PERMIT REQUIRED - SITE DRAWING

* All hunters must park in designated parking areas. Parking along roadways is prohibited.
** Only antlerless deer or antlered deer having at least four points on one side may be harvested.
*** The first and third days of the regular firearm deer season and every Tuesday and Saturday, thereafter.
**** Trapping is also allowed for furbearing mammals. A special trapping permit is issued through a site drawing.
***** Site is open to archery deer and turkey hunting during regular firearm season dates. Blaze orange requirements are in effect.

SITE REGULATIONS:

It Shall Be Unlawful:

For any person to construct or to use any tree stand using nails, screws, wire, steps, or any device which pierces or cuts the bark of the tree on which it is installed. Only one portable stand may be used and must be labeled with the hunter's name, address, and telephone number or a site assigned number.
For any person to possess or consume beer, wine, or alcoholic or intoxicating liquor while hunting on the area.
For any person to use vehicles on internal roads that are posted closed.
To hunt on the area without checking in and out to register and report their harvest.
To hunt in any areas where signage indicates "closed to hunting." These areas may occur at or around building sites.
OTHER SITE FACILITIES: None
FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT: Siloam Springs State Park at (217) 894-6205.

MISSISSIPPI RIVER STATE FISH AND WILDLIFE AREA
Imagine an area that includes 15 wildlife management areas and 13 public access areas, spanning more than 24,000 acres, and scattered along 75 miles of two major rivers. Add to this awe-inspiring bluffs that tower over the river valley, providing breathtaking views, and you begin to get some idea of what awaits you at the Mississippi River State Fish and Wildlife Area (MRA).
As its name implies, the area lies within Mississippi River Navigation Pools 25 and 26, and includes portions of both the Illinois and Mississippi Rivers. The total project area consists of 24,386 acres of General Plan Lands. Of this total, 16,875 acres are actively managed for wetland habitat enhancement and public recreation.

The Mississippi River Area's main emphasis is wetland management, with waterfowl as the primary species of concern. Hunters, fishermen, boaters and birdwatchers can enjoy the beauty of the area, yet there is ample opportunity for access to civilization just a few miles away.

A drive along the scenic Great River Road leads through Grafton, past Elsah, a quaint 19th century village, and on to Alton, with many antique stores and other accommodations. A ride on the Brussels Ferry takes you across the Illinois River and into Calhoun County where apple orchards and roadside markets await. There is truly something for every type of visitor to the area.

History
The Mississippi River Area has a rich history. Evidence of millions of years of geological change can be seen throughout, including four to five thousand feet of sedimentary rock. The bluffs between Alton and Grafton are only a tiny fraction of the thousands of feet of rock extending below the surface.

The Ice Age saw the advancement and regression of four glaciers. The last glacier, the Wisconsin, did not enter the area, but the melting ice widened the river valleys and contributed silt, sand and gravels to the two river systems. The melding of two such major river systems strongly influenced both ancient and modern man.

Archeologists have identified four cultural periods within the Upper Mississippi River Valley. They are: Paleo (prior to 5000B.C.); Eastern Archaic (5000 to 1000 B.C.); Woodland (2000 B.C.to 1400 A.D.), and the Mississippian (800 to 1700 A.D.). The Mississippian was strongly influenced by the Woodland Culture as evidenced by large populated sites, intensive agriculture and religious cults.

Europeans began exploring the area in the mid-18th century. By 1824, the importance of the Mississippi River as a trade and transportation route had been established, and Congress appropriated $75,000 to remove dead trees (snags) from the river.

Congress appropriated funds in 1907 to create a six-foot navigation channel, but existing technology was not adequate. The 1927 River and Harbors Act authorized study of the Mississippi between Minneapolis and the Missouri River. The outcome of this study was a 1930 authorization to build 24 low-head dams with locks between Minneapolis and Alton.

In 1944, Congress approved the Flood Control Act, which authorized the development of recreational facilities on public access areas. The Fish and Wildlife Act of 1946 provided for establishment of a General Plan and Cooperative Agreement to use the navigation channel project lands and water for fish and wildlife conservation and management.

The majority of MRA lands and waters are referred to as General Plan lands, under management by the State of Illinois in accordance with a 1961 General Plan and 1963 cooperative agreement with the Department of the Interior. These lands are managed as fish and wildlife areas, while day use and access are under separate lease agreement with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

Federal Involvement
In 1937, the Federal Aid in Wildlife Restoration Act, better known as the Pittman-Robertson Act, imposed an 11 percent manufacturer's tax on sporting arms and ammunition, which is used to fund wildlife restoration and management activities. The Federal Aid in Fish Restoration Act, known as the Dingell-Johnson Act, was passed in 1950 and created a 10 percent manufacturer's tax on fishing tackle, which is used to fund fish restoration and management efforts. The MRA has participated in these federal programs since 1958. The Federal Aid was removed in Fiscal Year 1999.

Hunting | Waterfowl Hunter Fact Sheet | Mississippi River Pools 21, 22, & 24 Hunter Fact Sheet |
Most of the areas within the Mississippi River Area are specifically managed for waterfowl, with 348 blind sites allocated by public drawing for three-year periods. Five waterfowl check stations are operated on the more intensively-used areas.

Forest game hunting is popular in most areas. Upland game is available, but not productive, due to annual flooding of the areas.

Hunting Maps: Mississippi River Area | Batchtown | Calhoun Point | Diamond & Hurricane Island | Glades Helmbold - 12 Mile Island | Illinois River | Piasa Island | Red's Landing | Riprap | Stump and Fuller Lake
Fishing
Anglers are welcome, but certain areas are restricted during waterfowl season. These areas are clearly posted each year.

Boating
Boating along the Mississippi and Illinois rivers provides many opportunities for relaxing, sunning, enjoying the scenic shoreline and bluffs, bird-watching and viewing the majesty of these great river systems. Smaller boats and canoes might better appreciate the shelter and quiet beauty that can be found in the backwater lakes.

Nearly 40 miles of the mighty Mississippi River are available via the Piasa Creek Access Area and Royal Landing; and the Glades, Godar Diamond, Hadley Landing and Michael Landing provide access along 35 miles of the Illinois River. All of these areas are contained in Navigation Pool 26.

Above Winfield Dam (Lock and Dam 25), Cockrell Hollow, Red's Landing and Riprap Landing provide access to 33 miles of Navigation Pool 25. Other Major Boat Access Ramps

Picnicking
In keeping with the pristine beauty of the area, picnic areas are available.

Camping
Camping is strictly prohibited in the entire MRA, but is available at Pere Marquette State Park, just north of Grafton on the Great River Road.


While groups of 25 or more are welcome and encouraged to use the park's facilities, they are required to register in advance with the site office to avoid crowding or scheduling conflicts.
At least one responsible adult must accompany each group of 15 minors.
Pets must be kept on leashes at all times.
Actions by nature can result in closed roads and other facilities. Please call ahead to the park office before you make your trip.
We hope you enjoy your stay. Remember, take only memories, leave only footprints.
For more information on tourism in Illinois, call the Illinois Department of Economic Opportunity, Bureau of Tourism at 1-800-2Connect.
Telecommunication Device for Deaf and Hearing Impaired Natural Resources Information (217) 782-9175 for TDD only Relay Number 800-526-0844.

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PERE MARQUETTE STATE PARK

A nature-lover's paradise, this 8,000-acre park is famous for the exceptional beauty of its fall colors and for its bald eagles during the winter. In addition to enjoying the spectacular view of the Illinois River and its backwaters from several points atop the bluffs, visitors can take advantage of a variety of year-round recreational opportunities, including horseback riding, camping, hiking, fishing, hunting, and boating.

Pere Marquette's Visitor Center, opened in October 1997, welcomes you with a three-dimensional map of the park and wealth of other displays and exhibits concerning the Illinois River, wildlife habitat, local history, and geology.

History

The history of Pere Marquette State Park centers around that of the Illinois River. The forces that formed the river can be traced to ancient glaciers that pushed their way down over most of Illinois, but stopped just short of the park land. In the path of the glaciers and their meltwaters, a rich network of streams and rivers were formed, and tons of soil and bedrock were ground to dust which rose and blew up against the hillsides. These ancient layers of wind-blown soil, called Loess (pronounced "less") can be seen along the roads and trails of Pere Marquette.

Gradual climate changes over thousands of years made the region an ideal environment for prairie grasses and plants which eventually covered two-thirds of Illinois. Deciduous forest, dominated by oak and hickory, held their ground along rivers, streams and upland hills protected from prairie fires.

Throughout the hills, ravines, and prairies, native American people hunted game, gathered food, and later made homes. Archaeologists describe six native American cultures common to this region. Evidence of their presence here have been found in the form of fragments of pottery, spear points, and planting tools. Burial mounds also are distributed throughout the park, including one atop McAdams Peak.

When Europeans began to explore the Illinois country, most of the Native Americans they met were members of the Illini tribe. The first of these explorers, in 1673, was a group led by Louis Joliet, a cartographer, and Pere (Father) Jacques Marquette, a french Jesuit missionary. Marquette and Joliet, accompanied by French voyageurs, paddled down the Mississippi River in search of a passage to the Pacific Ocean. On the Mississippi Bluffs, they encountered something which has become a local legend: "we saw . . two painted monsters which at first made us afraid and upon which the boldest savages dare not long rest their eyes." They learned that the creature was part bird, with the face of a man, scales like a fish, horns like a deer, a long black tail. The creature was called Piasa. A representation of the Piasa Bird is still maintained in paint on the bluffs about twenty miles from the park.

Learning from the Native Americans that the Mississippi River emptied into the Gulf of Mexico, Marquette and Joliet turned back, returning by way of the Illinois River and stopping near what is now Pere Marquette State Park. A large stone cross east of the park entrance commemorates their historic landing here.

Generations later, local civic groups sought to preserve this land by the river as a state park. They raised money and were successful in persuading the state to match their funds for the purchase of the land in 1931. The newly created state park was to be called Piasa Bluffs. By popular demand, it was soon renamed Pere Marquette State Park in honor of the adventurous French missionary.

There is much to enjoy in the surrounding area, including sensational scenery, award-winning wineries, golf courses, restaurants, water activities, sporting events, antique shopping, historical museums, and more. The park is located along one of the most beautiful stretches of the Great River Road, a section that has been designated as the Meeting of the Great Rivers Scenic Byway. We are just an hour from the city of St. Louis, Missouri. Visit any of the following web sites for up-to-date information on local events and attractions:
Lodging

Pere Marquette Lodge and Conference Center was originally built in the 1930s by the Civilian Conservation Corps, but has been expanded and updated in recent years. Today, native stone and rustic timbers of the original Lodge blend with the new to provide first class accommodations in an historical setting. The mammoth stone fireplace in the lobby soars to a roof height of 50 feet, and is said to weigh 700 tons.

There are 50 spacious guest rooms and 22 stone guest cabin rooms. Among the facilities available are a cocktail lounge, gift shop, indoor swimming pool, whirlpool, saunas, game room and tennis court.

Pere Marquette Lodge provides elegant dining, with a Sunday brunch that draws people from Missouri as well as Illinois. The dining room seats 150 people and offers a choice of family style dining or selections from the menu.

The 2,900 square-foot conference center has banquet facilities to accommodate 300, and a comprehensive selection of audio/visual equipment. The center breaks into four separate meeting rooms.

For more information or reservations, write Pere Marquette Lodge and Conference Center, Route 100,
PO Box 429, Grafton, IL 62037, or call (618) 786-2331, fax (618) 786-3498, E-mail

If you prefer a more rustic experience, Pere Marquette offers a wide range of camping opportunities:

Our Class A campground has 80 sites, two of which are handicap accessible. Sites have electrical hookups only, with a sanitary dump station, drinking water, and a shower building available on the grounds. Sites 2-30 are available for reservation from May through October. The nearby Class B tent camping area also has access to the shower building.
Within the Class A campground, the park offers two Rent-A-Camp cabins Rent-A-Camp cabin.
Popular among scout groups is the Youth Tent Camp Area, also known as Duncan Hill. This separate campground offers a picnic shelter and tables, pit-type toilets, and drinking water.
For large organized groups, Pere Marquette operates three Organized Group Camps. Camp Potawatomi accommodates 68 campers; Camp Piasa and Camp Ouatoga will each accommodate 145. All three camps feature fully-equipped kitchens and dining rooms, lighted sleeping cabins with cots and mattresses, and restroom facilities with warm showers and flush toilets. Camps Piasa and Ouatoga also feature swimming pools.
Reservations for all types of camping are accepted by mail only beginning on the first working day in January. Reservations may be made by telephone or in person beginning February 1st. We accept MasterCard and Visa for all fees. Contact our Visitor Center for more information. Campsite/Cabin Reservation Form | Organized Group Camp Reservation Form | Duncan Hill Tent Camp Form

Picnicking

Plenty of picnic areas are available throughout the park, with tables, grills and trash containers provided. Three picnic shelters are available, and may be reserved. A fee is required to reserve shelters. Shelter Reservation Application

Boating and Fishing

A wide variety of fish such as bluegill, carp, catfish, crappie, drum, largemouth bass, and white bass, attract anglers to the Illinois and Mississippi River. Launching ramps and ample parking provide access to the river, with courtesy docks available when weather conditions and river levels permit. Future plans include a full-service marina. Two Rivers Fishing Fair

Hiking

Approximately 12 miles of marked trails provide scenic hiking to beginners and experienced hikers alike. Lush forests, towering bluffs, and an abundance of wildlife provide the perfect backdrop for your outing. Trail maps are available at the Visitor Center.

Interpretive Programs

A full-time site interpreter and seasonal interpreters are available to provide educational programs to groups of all ages. Hikes, recreational activities, and other interpretive events are scheduled on a regular basis, particularly in the fall. Eagle tours are offered from late December to late February. For more information, contact the Visitor Center.

Horseback Riding

The park offers about 20 miles of equestrian trails with a parking area for your trailers on Graham Hollow Road. The trails to the west of Graham Hollow are open year-round. The trails east of Graham Hollow will be closed during certain seasons of the year. These areas will be posted when closed.

Pere Marquette Riding stables is open for trail rides every day except Tuesday, weather permitting, from May through October. Please call 618/786-2156 for a reservation.

Bike Trail

The Sam Vadalabene Bike Trail runs from Pere Marquette State Park to the City of Alton, approximately 20 miles. The entire trail is paved.

Bird Watching

About 230 species of birds have been identified within, at the boundaries of, or flying over Pere Marquette State Park. A checklist has been prepared by local birders, in cooperation with the Department of Natural Resources, as is available at the Visitor Center. Popular locations for bird watching are Stump Lake, in the river bottoms, and McAdams Peak and other overlooks along the scenic drive through the park.

Hunting Programs

The 2,000 acre public hunting area located off Graham Hollow Road has good standsof mature oak and hickory timber, which provide excellent habitat for squirrel, deer, and turkey. These game species may be hunted in this area in accordance with statewide seasons and regulations, with the exception of squirrel season, which begins the day after Labor Day in the Park. Another 1,147 acres is available for public hunting at Copperhead Hollow Wildlife Area, located on Nutwood Road, approximately 5 miles north of the park. The topography of this area varies from steep hills to bottomland floodplain (Otter Creek). The bottomland areas are mostly farm fields. The hills consist of mostly oak/hickory woodlands with some areas becoming dominated by maple. Deer, turkey, squirrel, raccoon, coyote and waterfowl may be hunted in this area according to statewide regulations. All hunters using the Public Hunting Areas at Graham Hollow Road or Cooperhead Hollow must obtain a free permit at the Visitor Center. Pere Marquette Hunter Fact Sheet | Copperhead Hollow Hunter Fact Sheet

Archery Deer Hunting is offered on an additional 3,000 acres in the three Organized Group Camp areas by special permit. Three one-week seasons are offered, beginning on the Monday after the last Sunday in October (when the group camps close for the season). By random drawing, 5 hunters are selected for each season in each area. The drawing for this hunt is held the first working day in April each year. Applications will be available by March 1st. Contact the Visitor Center for applications and information. Archery Deer Application

Spring Turkey Hunting is also available in the Organized Group Camp areas by special permit. To be considered for this hunt, hunters must use the statewide Firearm Turkey Permit application, and apply for Pere Marquette Group Camp Area. For further information, contact the Visitor Center, or the IDNR Permit Office at (217) 782-7305.

Videos and Audio

View the video below to learn more about Pere Marquette State Park. There is also an "Audio Only" option if you would like to just listen or save the file to take on your MP3 player.
The Park by the River - Pere Marquette State Park
http://www.multimedia.illinois.gov/dnr/park-by-river.mp3

While groups of 25 or more are welcome and encouraged to use the park's facilities, they are required to register in advance with the site office to avoid crowding or scheduling conflicts.
At least one responsible adult must accompany each group of 15 minors.
Pets must be kept on leashes at all times.
Actions by nature can result in closed roads and other facilities. Please call ahead to the park office before you make your trip.
We hope you enjoy your stay. Remember, take only memories, leave only footprints.
For more information on tourism in Illinois, call the Illinois Department of Commerce and Community Affairs' Bureau of Tourism at 1-800-2Connect.
Telecommunication Device for Deaf and Hearing Impaired Natural Resources Information (217) 782-9175 for TDD only Relay Number 800-526-0844Two Rivers Land Co. Inc.; Buy Illinois hunting land; Illinois hunting land for sale; Illinois hunting property for sale; Illinois hunting farms;

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RAY NORBUT STATE FISH AND WILDLIFE AREA
Ray Norbut - State Fish & Wildlife Area

West-Central Region

Rural Route #1, Box 55C
Griggsville, IL 62340
217.833.2811
E-mail

Site Map Fishing Hunting
Eagle Watching History Trails


Ray Norbut Fish and Wildlife Area is a 1,140-acre mosaic of bottomlands, woodlands, wetlands, open fields, steep hills, rocky ravines, hollows, brushy draws and bluffs. Located along the Illinois River, it lies five miles east of Griggsville and two miles south of Valley City in Pike County. Big Blue Island, a narrow, 100-acre strip of land in the river, is part of the conservation area. Other notable geographic features are two west-east flowing streams-Blue Creek, a river tributary, and the spring-fed Napoleon Hollow Creek.

This site provides exceptional habitat for a wide range of harvestable, non-harvestable, uncommon, threatened or endangered plants and animals. Examples are the endangered bald eagle, a winter resident of the wooded blufflands, and the jeweled shooting star, a rare pre-glacial relict wildflower species. To provide a refuge for the eagles, portions of the bluff areas are closed to the public seasonally.

Oak and hickory are the dominant tree species in a woodland that also contains red cedar, red and white oak, sugar maple, ironwood, blue beech and, in the bottomlands, abundant willow, cottonwood and silver maple. The oak/hickory community is the highest quality forest in the region and supports a diverse assemblage of wildlife.

Forests, bluffs and limestone outcroppings are rich in wildflowers and ferns. Among the wildflowers are hepatica, Dutchman’s breeches, spring beauties, toothwort, yellow bellwort, trout lily, trillium, wild ginger, larkspur, phlox, wild petunia, Venus looking glass and May apple. The ferns include cliffbrake, Christmas and woolly lip species.

Although intended primarily for public hunting, the conservation area also beckons hikers and nature enthusiasts with several undeveloped trails, one of which has a trailhead parking lot. Fishing is permitted, too, in the Illinois River and Blue Creek. Hunting land in Illinois “Golden Triangle

No facilities or programs exist for camping, picnicking, horseback riding, water sports, winter activities or other recreational pursuits.

Pre-history

Archaeological evidence found at Ray Norbut Fish and Wildlife Area indicates a densely populated settlement existed there during the Middle Woodland Era, about 2,000 years ago. It’s not certain what the community’s purposes were and whether it was permanent or occupied only intermittently. However, discovery of more than a dozen burial mound groups and other cultural remains within the site suggest it was a mortuary camp and headquarters for other, non-mortuary rituals and ceremonies. Scientific investigations dating back to the 1800's have documented occupancy of the tract by cultures as old as 8,000 years and as recent as 200 years ago.

History

Initial Conservation Department land acquisitions at the site, in 1970, totaled 860 acres. Another 280 acres were added in 1988 to bring the area to its present size. Designated from the outset for public hunting, the facility was called Pike County Conservation Area. The name was retained until 1995, when it was changed to honor Raymond J. Norbut, an employee of the Department of Conservation for more than 36 years and superintendent of state parks for a decade.

According to historical account, Pike County’s first Caucasian resident settled along the river in Flint Township within what is now the Ray Norbut Fish and Wildlife Area. Later, the historic settlement of Big Blue Hollow-the county’s second-ranked center of commerce in 1842-was established on Blue Creek in Detroit Township, at the southern end of the conservation area. Big Blue Hollow boasted three flour mills, a sawmill, a store, stone quarry and several residences.

Elsewhere on the conservation area are a limestone kiln used to make masonry mortar in the mid- to late 1800's, several 19th-century homesteads, a family cemetery, a homestead having both historic and prehistoric significance, a number of burial mounds and other archaeological sites. Research on these structures and sites continues.

Hunting

All but 140 of the conservation area’s 1,140 acres are open to hunting. Timber occupies approximately 900 acres and open fields-some cultivated as wildlife food plots-comprise the remainder of the vegetative cover. Sunflower fields supply food for doves in the late summer and fall, while small grain plots help sustain a wide range of birds and other creatures during the winter. Hunting is allowed for dove, squirrel, deer, turkey, rabbit, quail, raccoon and waterfowl. Statewide seasons, shooting hours and bag limits apply. All hunters should check-in at site headquarters to be informed of site specific regulations. Hunter Fact Sheet

Fishing

Bank fishing is allowed in the Illinois River and Blue Creek, where bass, bluegill, catfish and crappie may be caught along with other species found in the river. Pull-off parking facilities for bank anglers are available in several locations, but there are no accommodations for launching or retrieving watercraft.

Trails

Hikers will find an undeveloped trail ranging from a quarter of a mile to almost a mile in each of the property’s three designated geographic zones-south, central and north. In addition, a gravel-surfaced township road also serves as a trail as it angles through and around the conservation area, forming the boundary line for one segment before coming to a dead-end at Blue Creek. No signs, toilets or other amenities are provided.

Winter Eagle Watching

After the fall/winter hunting seasons conclude, most of the conservation area south of I-72 is closed for the benefit of bald eagles wintering on the river bluffs. Bald eagle viewing is allowed, but watchers are not allowed south of the highway bridges.

While groups of 25 or more are welcome and encouraged to use the park's facilities, they are required to register in advance with the site office to avoid crowding or scheduling conflicts.
At least one responsible adult must accompany each group of 15 minors.
Pets must be kept on leashes at all times.
Actions by nature can result in closed roads and other facilities. Please call ahead to the park office before you make your trip.
We hope you enjoy your stay. Remember, take only memories, leave only footprints.
For more information on tourism in Illinois, call the Illinois Department of Economic Opportunity, Bureau of Tourism at 1-800-2Connect.
Telecommunication Device for Deaf and Hearing Impaired Natural Resources Information (217) 782-9175 for TDD only Relay Number 800-526-0844.

WEINBERG-KING STATE PARK
Weinberg-King State Fish & Wildlife AreA

West-Central Region

P.O. Box 203
Augusta, IL 62311
217.392.2345
E-mail

Site Map History Picnicking
Camping Hunting Trails
Fishing Natural Features

Weinberg-King State Fish and Wildlife Area is an area of rolling hills with a meandering creek in western Illinois. The 772-acre State Fish & Wildlife Area, including a 4-acre pond, is in Schuyler County 3 miles east of Augusta north of Route 101.

Mrs. Gertrude K. Allen presented a deed for about 500 acres of this land to the State of Illinois in May 1968. An additional 295 acres was purchased by the Department of Natural Resources. All Illinois land for sale is in close proximenty to all the Illinoi State Parks featured in this article. Buy Illinois land, hunting land in Illinois “Golden Triangle”

History

The late Mrs. Allen presented the deed for the property to Conservation Department officials in an informal ceremony held in her home in Augusta. She had indicated a desire for some time to do something in memory of her parents, the late Fredrick M. and Fredricka Weinberg King and her three brothers, Jacob Weinberg King, Harry M. King and L. Edson King. Max Weinberg, a Quincy attorney and a cousin of Mrs. Allen, made arrangements for the land to be given to the state in accordance with the wish of the 85-year-old benefactor. The legislature honored this wish for a family memorial by officially naming the area Weinberg-King State Fish & Wildlife Area.

The land, estimated to be worth more than $250,000, had been owned by the Allen family since 1905. Most of the land was not cultivated but was maintained as a permanent pasture. The 295-acre farm purchased from Paul Dennis was partly in cultivation and contained the 3.8-acre farm pond. Dennis previously operated a commercial poultry products cannery and the "turkey houses" fronting the highway were landmarks in the area until they were removed to make way for the new road into the Fish & Wildlife Area.

Natural Features

The terrain is rolling with steep hillsides. Williams Creek picturesquely meanders through the park for about 2 miles. The average depth of the creek is about 3 feet. The majority of mature trees are locust and osage orange, although pines, autumn olive, honeysuckle, oak and walnut trees have been planted. Many wildflowers are found on the hillsides and along the creek.

Dove, quail, and songbirds familiar to the area may be observed. The fox squirrel and rabbit are plentiful and a deer and turkey is frequently seen.

Picnicking

There are four picnic areas with tables and park stoves. Parking lots and pit toilets are nearby. Water is available at two drinking hydrants and playground equipment is provided.

Trails

Horseback riders will find 30 miles of good trail through the Fish & Wildlife Area. Snowmobiling is allowed during the winter months.

Camping

In the equestrian area, there is a class B/E campround open to equestrian campers. The campground has 19 electrical hook-ups and pads. There is also a non-electric Class C campground available for all other non-equestrian campers.

Fishing

Williams Creek contains bluegill, bullhead, channel catfish and smallmouth bass for bank fishermen. Three ponds are also available to fish in.

Hunting

Most of the Fish & Wildlife Area is available for upland game hunting in season. Consult the park ranger for information concerning shooting times and opening dates for various game. Hunter Fact Sheet | Scripps Unit Hunter Fact Sheet

While groups of 25 or more are welcome and encouraged to use the park's facilities, they are required to register in advance with the site office to avoid crowding or scheduling conflicts.
At least one responsible adult must accompany each group of 15 minors.
Pets must be kept on leashes at all times.
Actions by nature can result in closed roads and other facilities. Please call ahead to the park office before you make your trip.
We hope you enjoy your stay. Remember, take only memories, leave only footprints.
For more information on tourism in Illinois, call the Illinois Department of Economic Opportunity, Bureau of Tourism at 1-800-2Connect.
Telecommunication Device for Deaf and Hearing Impaired Natural Resources Information (217) 782-9175 for TDD only Relay Number 800-526-0844.


NAUVOO STATE PARK

Its first name was Quashquema, a Fox Indian word meaning "peaceful place." Its current name is Nauvoo, a Hebrew word for "beautiful place" or "pleasant land." This historic town is the backdrop for Nauvoo State Park, on the banks of the Mississippi River in western Illinois' Hancock County.

The 148-acre park, on the south edge of Nauvoo along Illinois Route 96, includes a 13-acre lake with a mile-long shoreline. In addition to fishing, boating, camping and hiking, people return to these serene surroundings for the park's recreational features, its annual grape festival, and to soak up the area's history.

Illinois hunting land for sale. West Central Illinois has some of the finest, most beautiful parks in the state. All listings are within a short driving distance to many of these parks. Illinois hunting land for sale. Buy Illinois land, hunting land in Illinois “Golden Triangle”

History

Once a Fox Indian village of 400 to 500 lodges, the site of Nauvoo was relinquished by a treaty in 1824 for 200 sacks of corn. Six years later, Hancock County's first post office was established here under the name of Venus. By 1834, the name had changed again, to Commerce, and later Commerce City, by some eastern land speculators.

Members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS), known as Mormons, settled here in 1839 in hopes of escaping religious persecution. After changing the name to Nauvoo, they incorporated the town and received a special charter from the Illinois Legislature.

Missionaries such as Brigham Young converted thousands in England and elsewhere, causing people to migrate to the area. The town grew as business and industry flourished. By 1844, its population surpassed Chicago's and Nauvoo became Illinois' largest city.

With the boom came an increase in criminal activity. Sentiment toward the Mormons was not favorable during this period, since many people blamed them for the lawlessness. Ironically, lawlessness figured prominently in 1844 when LDS Founder Joseph Smith was shot and killed in the Hancock County jail in Carthage while he was supposed to be under protective custody.

The religious differences that caused the Mormons to settle in Nauvoo also caused them to leave. In 1846, they were driven from Illinois and, under Brigham Young, the majority left for Utah. Others migrated to Texas and Michigan. A few, including the family of Joseph Smith, remained in Nauvoo and formed the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (RLDS).

The Mormon Temple

Joseph Smith began building a temple in the early 1840s. It was four stories high, measured 128 by 88 feet, and featured an 82-foot octagonal tower. Church Elder William Weeks served as architect and directed the work of dozens of skilled craftsmen. Although incomplete, services were first held in the temple in 1844. Because of Smith's assassination that same year, the temple was never finished. Despite this fact, it was said to have been the finest building in the west at the time, with the cost of materials estimated to have been $1 million.

An arsonist set fire to the temple in 1848. Three years later, it was completely destroyed by a tornado. Stone from the temple has been incorporated into other Nauvoo buildings, but one original architectural feature can be seen in Nauvoo. A decorative cap to one of the temple's pilasters is displayed inside a covered cage to protect it from direct sunlight and rain. Called a "sunstone" because it depicts a sun with a radiant face, the two-piece, 2.5-ton limestone carving was one of 30 such stones that adorned the columns. The pilasters also featured the same number of "moonstones" and "starstones," and some of these are still in existence. However, the sunstone displayed at Nauvoo is one of only two known to exist. It is owned by the State, on loan to the LDS Church, and displayed at the original temple site. The other was acquired by the Smithsonian Institution in 1989.

Today both the LDS and RLDS churches have visitor centers plus restored homes and shops adjacent to the park that are open throughout the year.

Icarians

Nauvoo went from being the state's largest city in 1844 to becoming all but a ghost town in the three years following the Mormon exodus. In 1849 a small group of French and German immigrants to the United States heard of the vacant city and decided to settle in Nauvoo. Their leader was a French political figure, Etienne Cabet, who wrote several books including the story of a utopian community, A Voyage into Icaria. The book gave members of this communistic colony the name "Icarians."

The colony broke up a few years later when the group found its communal way of life unworkable. Before the Icarians split up, however, they introduced grape growing and wine making to the area. While most of the local vineyards have disappeared, the first vineyard planted in Nauvoo still exists on park property and is maintained by park personnel. Many of the former wine cellars are now vacant, although one is used in the manufacture of Nauvoo's Roquefort-type blue cheese, which has received international awards.

Plant and Animal Life

A 4-acre plot of land adjacent to the site superintendent's residence has been converted into a natural area. Four kinds of prairie grasses and approximately 10 kinds of prairie flowers are grown here. If you're visiting here in the spring, you may find the area burnt to a crisp -- that's because the grasses must be burned periodically to help the prairie renew itself.

Deer, skunk, opossum and raccoon are among the animals that call Nauvoo State Park home. Cardinals and gold finches find this spot on the Mississippi a perfect place to nest, as do geese and ducks. The welcome mat is especially out for wood ducks, who will nest just about anywhere. Look for their boxes 15 to 20 feet up in the trees around Lake Horton and in the posted and protected area across from the park's extreme south edge.

Museum

A house built by Mormons in the 1840s, remodeled by Icarians, and later owned by the Rheinberger family serves as the Nauvoo State Park Museum. The restored home features a wine cellar and a press room, and has the only Nauvoo wine cellar open to the public. This also is the location of Nauvoo's first vineyard, which has been producing grapes since the mid-1800s. The museum itself exhibits artifacts from all periods of Nauvoo's history, from Native American occupation to the introduction of Nauvoo Blue Cheese in the 1930s. The museum is staffed by the Nauvoo Historical Society and is open 1-5 afternoons from May 1 through October 15.

Fishing and Boating

Lake Horton, a 13-acre manmade fishing lake, is stocked for anglers wanting to catch largemouth bass, channel catfish and bluegill. Although there are no boat docks or boat rentals, a primitive boat launch is available. Only electric trolling motors are allowed.

Camping

Nauvoo State Park offers 150 camping spaces, equally divided between Class A and Class B areas. A youth group area is centrally located in the park. Don't forget to ask for permission -- all campers must obtain a permit for overnight camping from the park office, and any group of 25 or more must get advance permission before entering the park.

Trails

The park's main trail, Locust Lane at 1.5 miles, shows off some of the park's best features. As the trail winds around the lake and through timbered areas, hikers can see and hear a variety of birds. There's also a three-eighths-mile loop from the camping area that's accessible to senior citizens and to those in wheelchairs. A short trail connects the main picnic and playground area to the dam, and there's also a short, one-way jaunt to Gilligan's Island on Lake Horton.

Picnic and Playground Areas

If picnicking is in your plans while visiting Nauvoo State Park, you're in luck. The park features two picnic and playground areas totaling 20 acres. In addition to playground equipment for kids, you'll find tables, stoves and two shelter houses, one equipped with modern toilet facilities. A ball diamond and two parking lots round out the list of amenities.

Grape Bowl, Sod Stage and South Areas

The Nauvoo Grape Festival, held annually over Labor Day weekend in the Grape Bowl and Sod Stage area directly west of Lake Horton, coincides with the ripening of the grapes. The festival includes an hour-long program depicting Nauvoo's history. A pageant, which for more than 50 years has paid tribute to two Nauvoo industries, observes an old French rite called "The Wedding of the Wine and Cheese." The festival's carnivals, entertainment tents, arts and crafts exhibits, flea markets, buckskinners, and car shows are held at the South Area, just south of the ball diamond.

Winter Sports

Sledding is permitted on the slopes adjacent to the dam of Lake Horton. Cross-country skiing is allowed along the trails when snow cover is adequate, but snowmobiling is not. Please note that the modern rest rooms are closed during winter months as is the museum.

Directions

From Chicago area take I80 west to I74. Take I74 south to Rte 34. Take Rte 34 West to Rte 67. Take Rte 67 South to Rte 136. Take Rte 136 west to Rte 96. Take Rte 96 north 12 miles to Nauvoo State Park.
From the East St. Louis, Alton area take Rte 67 north to Rte 136. Take Rte 136 west to Rte 96. Take Rte 96 north 12 miles to Nauvoo State Park.

While groups of 25 or more are welcome and encouraged to use the park's facilities, they are required to register in advance with the site office to avoid crowding or scheduling conflicts.
At least one responsible adult must accompany each group of 15 minors.
Pets must be kept on leashes at all times.
Actions by nature can result in closed roads and other facilities. Please call ahead to the park office before you make your trip.
We hope you enjoy your stay. Remember, take only memories, leave only footprints.

Illinois hunting land for sale

FALL CREEK OVERLOOK
Siloam Springs - Fall Creek Hunter Fact Sheet

2008 - 2009 Season
INTRODUCTION: The Fall Creek Unit of Siloam Springs State Park was originally developed as a rest area that overlooks the Mississippi River valley in southwest Adams County. Although the area has a limited acreage, it contains high-quaility forest game hunting opportunities.

LOCATION: Siloam Springs State Park Fall Creek Unit is located three miles southwest of Payson or twelve miles south of Quincy in Adams County.

Total Acres: 222 Open Acres: 32 Water Acres: 2 (Fall Creek)
Huntable Acres: 190 Timbered Acres: 190

SETTING: The area is comprised of a mixture of wooded ravines with crop fields present on the ridges and in the creek bottoms. Many of the crop fields have been idled and established to perennial grasses. In others, natural succession of woody plants is occurring at various stages. The woodlands consist of a relatively young stand of oak-hickory timber with some interspersed brushy fallowed pasture areas.
SPECIAL RULES/PERMITS
DEER (BOW ONLY) STATEWIDE STATEWIDE Illinois archery deer permit required.

No other species may be hunted at this site.

SITE REGULATIONS:
It Shall Be Unlawful:
For any person to construct or to use any tree stand using nails, screws, wire, steps, or any device which pierces or cuts the bark of the tree on which it is installed. Only one portable stand may be used and must be labeled with the hunter's name, address, and telephone number or a site assigned number.
For any person to possess or consume beer, wine, or alcoholic or intoxicating liquor while hunting on the area.
For any person to use vehicles on internal roads that are posted closed.
To hunt on the area within 50 yards of the designated picnic or parking areas.
OTHER SITE FACILITIES: Hiking trail

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT: Siloam Springs State Park, 938 East 3003 Lane, Clayton, IL 62324. (217) 894-6205

Equal opportunity to participate in programs of the Illinois Department of Natural Resources (IDNR) and those funded by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and other agencies is available to all individuals regardless of race, sex, national origin, disability, age, religion, or other non-merit factors. If you believe you have been discriminated against, contact the funding source's civil rights office and/or the Equal Employment Opportunity Officer, IDNR, 1 Natural Resources Way, Springfield, IL 62702-1271; (217)785-0067; TTY (217)782-9175.

WEINBERG-KING SCRIPPS UNIT
Weinberg-King State Park - Scripps Unit Hunter Fact Sheet
2008 - 2009 Season
INTRODUCTION: Weinberg-King State Park Scripps Unit was acquired by the State of Illinois in the Spring of 2002. The site is characterized by high-quality forest game hunting opportunities. Wildlife habitat enhancement practices such as food plots and rotational mowing improve hunting opportunities. Additional management practices will be implemented in the future.

LOCATION: Weinberg-King State Park Scripps Unit is located two miles southwest of Rushville off Route 24 in Schuyler County.

DESCRIPTION:
Total Acres: 736 Open Acres: 226 Water Acres: 2 (Horney Branch)
Huntable Acres: 730 Timbered Acres: 508

SETTING: The area is comprised of a mixture of wooded ravines with crop fields present on the ridges and in the creek bottoms. Many of the crop fields have been idled and established to perennial grasses. In others, natural succession of woody plants is occurring at various stages. The woodlands consist of a relatively young stand of oak-hickory timber with some interspersed brushy fallowed pasture areas.



SPECIAL RULES/PERMITS*
SQUIRREL STATEWIDE STATEWIDE NONE
DOVE STATEWIDE NOON-5 P.M. THRU SEPT 5 THEN STATEWIDE NONE
DEER
STATEWIDE STATEWIDE SPECIAL PERMIT REQUIRED *** (Springfield Drawing - firearm)
TURKEY (FALL) STATEWIDE STATEWIDE SPECIAL PERMIT REQUIRED (SPRINGFIELD DRAWING)
TURKEY (SPRING) STATEWIDE STATEWIDE SPECIAL PERMIT REQUIRED
(Springfield Drawing)
RABBIT/QUAIL STATEWIDE STATEWIDE NONE
RACCOON** SITE SPECIFIC STATEWIDE SPECIAL PERMIT REQUIRED
SITE DRAWING

* All hunters must park in designated parking areas. Parking along roadways is prohibited.
** Trapping is also allowed for furbearing mammals. A special trapping permit is issued through a site drawing.
*** Free site permit required for archery deer hunting (Illinois residents only).

SITE REGULATIONS:
For any person to construct or to use any tree stand using nails, screws, wire, steps, or any device which pierces or cuts the bark of the tree on which it is installed. Only one portable stand may be used and must be labeled with the hunter's name, address, and telephone number or a site assigned number.
For any person to possess or consume beer, wine, or alcoholic or intoxicating liquor while hunting on the area.
For any person to use vehicles on internal roads that are posted closed.
To hunt on the area without checking in and out to register and report their harvest.
To hunt in any areas where signage indicates "closed to hunting." These areas may occur at or around building sites.
To use dogs for coyote hunting
OTHER SITE FACILITIES: None

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT: Weinberg-King State Park at (217) 392-2345.

Equal opportunity to participate in programs of the Illinois Department of Natural Resources (IDNR) and those funded by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and other agencies is available to all individuals regardless of race, sex, national origin, disability, age, religion, or other non-merit factors. If you believe you have been discriminated against, contact the funding source's civil rights office and/or the Equal Employment Opportunity Officer, IDNR, 1 Natural Resources

WEINBERG-KING SPUNKY BOTTOMS UNIT
Weinberg-King State Park - Spunky Bottoms Unit Hunter Fact Sheet

2008 - 2009 Season
INTRODUCTION: The Spunky Bottoms Unit was acquired by the State of Illinois in the Spring of 2002. The acquisition is part of a joint project between the IDNR, Army Corps of Engineers, and The Nature Conservancy to restore an historic backwater lake of the Illinois River. Restoration efforts call for the eventual retirement of cropland to develop wetlands, woodlands, and grasslands on the site.

LOCATION: Spunky Bottoms Unit is located a little over a mile downstream from the LaGrange Lock and Dam on the Illinois River. The site is located in Brown County about 10 miles southeast of Mt. Sterling.

DESCRIPTION:
Total Acres: 833 Cropland/Open Acres: 528 Water Acres: 5
Huntable Acres: 800 Timbered Acres: 300

SETTING: The area is characterized by river bottom cropland, forested bluffs and river bottoms. Wooded drainage ditches and standing crop food plots are also present on the site. This diversity adds to a habitat matrix which provides a variety of hunting opportunities. Additional management practices such as wetland restoration will be implemented in the future.

SPECIES
SEASON
HOURS
SPECIAL RULES/PERMITS*
Squirrel STATEWIDE STATEWIDE NONE
Dove STATEWIDE STATEWIDE NONE
Deer (Archery Only)
STATEWIDE STATEWIDE ILLINOIS RESIDENTS ONLY
Deer (All Firearm Seasons) STATEWIDE STATEWIDE NONE
Turkey (FALL ARCHERY)

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